NATO Summit Outcomes Panel
Sep
27
2:00 PM14:00

NATO Summit Outcomes Panel

In partnership with the NATO Association of Canada, the Bill Graham Centre is hosting a panel to discuss the ramifications of the 2018 Brussels NATO Summit in July. The panelists include the distinguished Ambassador David Wright, General Jon Janzen, and the Centre’s own Acting Director Jack Cunningham.

Please RSVP by emailing rsvp@natoassociation.ca.

View Event →
Trump and Trade
Oct
1
2:00 PM14:00

Trump and Trade

What are the prospects for NAFTA and trade in the era of Donald Trump? Come and hear two former External Affairs officials discuss this and related questions.

Speakers: Larry Herman is a Toronto trade lawyer and former head of the Economic Treaty Law Section of the Legal Bureau, External Affairs Canada. Jon Allen is a Fellow of the Munk School and former Assistant Deputy Minister of Foreign Affairs for the Americas.
Chair: The Hon. Bill Graham is a former Minister of Foreign Affairs, Minister of National Defence, and Leader of the Official Opposition.

To register, click here.

A special thank you to our co-sponsors, the International Relations Society and Trinity College. 

View Event →

Book Launch: The Age of Eisenhower by William Hitchcock
Sep
13
6:00 PM18:00

Book Launch: The Age of Eisenhower by William Hitchcock

  • The Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk School of Global Affairs and Public Policy (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

The BGC is honoured to host the debut of Professor Hitchcock's New York Times bestseller The Age of Eisenhower

To register, please click here. Books for sale and signing. Refreshments provided. 

We look forward to seeing you there!

William I. Hitchcock is the William W. Corcoran Professor of History at the University of Virginia. He has written or edited six books on the international, diplomatic and military history of the 20th Century, in particular the era of the World Wars and the Cold War. 

He received his B.A. degree from Kenyon College in 1986, and his Ph.D. from Yale University in 1994. His book The Bitter Road to Freedom: A New History of the Liberation of Europe (Free Press, 2008), was a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize, a winner of the George Louis Beer Prize, and a Financial Times bestseller.

He lives in Charlottesville with his wife, Elizabeth Varon, who is a historian of the US Civil War.

For more about the book, visit AgeofEisenhower.com.

View Event →
Canadian Foreign Intelligence History Project Workshop
Jul
12
8:30 AM08:30

Canadian Foreign Intelligence History Project Workshop

In partnership with the Centre for Security, Intelligence and Defence Studies at Carleton University, the BGC is hosting the Canadian Foreign Intelligence History Project Workshop. Led by Senior Fellow Alan Barnes and Professor Timothy Sayle, the event seeks to encourage the study of the history of the foreign intelligence assessment function in Canada by facilitating the exchange of information among researchers and providing a forum for formal and informal collaboration. This collaborative effort will provide a foundation for the greater integration of the history of intelligence assessment into the broader study of Canadian foreign and defence policy in order to inform students, scholars and policy-makers.

Registration is required by May 18, 2018. 

 

View Event →
Curious Minds Morning Speaker Series
Jun
28
10:00 AM10:00

Curious Minds Morning Speaker Series

Join Professor John English at Hot Docs Cinema for an enlightening discussion on Pierre Trudeau's influence on Canada under the wave of "Trudeaumania".

Fifty years ago this spring, Pierre Trudeau became Prime Minister of Canada and Trudeaumania swept the nation. This six-week course will take you on an unforgettable journey through the life and times of the Canadian icon. We’ll relive the political excitement of the 1960s and 70s while exploring how and why Trudeau’s image and legacy continue to endure. 
 

The Director of the Bill Graham Centre for Contemporary International History at Trinity College, John English is the author of the two-volume biography Just Watch Me: The Life of Pierre Elliott Trudeau, which was chosen as one of the ten best biographies of the decade in 2010 by Indigo and one of the twenty-five most influential Canadian books by the Literary Review of Canada in 2017.
 

Sign up for the six week course registration: $63 | Single class: $21
Registration

Thursdays, May 24 – June 28
10:00 AM – 12:00 PM

View Event →
Curious Minds Morning Speaker Series
Jun
21
10:00 AM10:00

Curious Minds Morning Speaker Series

Join Professor John English at Hot Docs Cinema for an enlightening discussion on Pierre Trudeau's influence on Canada under the wave of "Trudeaumania".

Fifty years ago this spring, Pierre Trudeau became Prime Minister of Canada and Trudeaumania swept the nation. This six-week course will take you on an unforgettable journey through the life and times of the Canadian icon. We’ll relive the political excitement of the 1960s and 70s while exploring how and why Trudeau’s image and legacy continue to endure. 
 

The Director of the Bill Graham Centre for Contemporary International History at Trinity College, John English is the author of the two-volume biography Just Watch Me: The Life of Pierre Elliott Trudeau, which was chosen as one of the ten best biographies of the decade in 2010 by Indigo and one of the twenty-five most influential Canadian books by the Literary Review of Canada in 2017.
 

Sign up for the six week course registration: $63 | Single class: $21
Registration

Thursdays, May 24 – June 28
10:00 AM – 12:00 PM

View Event →
Curious Minds Morning Speaker Series
Jun
14
10:00 AM10:00

Curious Minds Morning Speaker Series

Join Professor John English at Hot Docs Cinema for an enlightening discussion on Pierre Trudeau's influence on Canada under the wave of "Trudeaumania".

Fifty years ago this spring, Pierre Trudeau became Prime Minister of Canada and Trudeaumania swept the nation. This six-week course will take you on an unforgettable journey through the life and times of the Canadian icon. We’ll relive the political excitement of the 1960s and 70s while exploring how and why Trudeau’s image and legacy continue to endure. 
 

The Director of the Bill Graham Centre for Contemporary International History at Trinity College, John English is the author of the two-volume biography Just Watch Me: The Life of Pierre Elliott Trudeau, which was chosen as one of the ten best biographies of the decade in 2010 by Indigo and one of the twenty-five most influential Canadian books by the Literary Review of Canada in 2017.
 

Sign up for the six week course registration: $63 | Single class: $21
Registration

Thursdays, May 24 – June 28
10:00 AM – 12:00 PM

View Event →
Curious Minds Morning Speaker Series
Jun
7
10:00 AM10:00

Curious Minds Morning Speaker Series

Join Professor John English at Hot Docs Cinema for an enlightening discussion on Pierre Trudeau's influence on Canada under the wave of "Trudeaumania".

Fifty years ago this spring, Pierre Trudeau became Prime Minister of Canada and Trudeaumania swept the nation. This six-week course will take you on an unforgettable journey through the life and times of the Canadian icon. We’ll relive the political excitement of the 1960s and 70s while exploring how and why Trudeau’s image and legacy continue to endure. 
 

The Director of the Bill Graham Centre for Contemporary International History at Trinity College, John English is the author of the two-volume biography Just Watch Me: The Life of Pierre Elliott Trudeau, which was chosen as one of the ten best biographies of the decade in 2010 by Indigo and one of the twenty-five most influential Canadian books by the Literary Review of Canada in 2017.
 

Sign up for the six week course registration: $63 | Single class: $21
Registration

Thursdays, May 24 – June 28
10:00 AM – 12:00 PM

View Event →
Curious Minds Morning Speaker Series
May
31
10:00 AM10:00

Curious Minds Morning Speaker Series

Join Professor John English at Hot Docs Cinema for an enlightening discussion on Pierre Trudeau's influence on Canada under the wave of "Trudeaumania".

Fifty years ago this spring, Pierre Trudeau became Prime Minister of Canada and Trudeaumania swept the nation. This six-week course will take you on an unforgettable journey through the life and times of the Canadian icon. We’ll relive the political excitement of the 1960s and 70s while exploring how and why Trudeau’s image and legacy continue to endure. 
 

The Director of the Bill Graham Centre for Contemporary International History at Trinity College, John English is the author of the two-volume biography Just Watch Me: The Life of Pierre Elliott Trudeau, which was chosen as one of the ten best biographies of the decade in 2010 by Indigo and one of the twenty-five most influential Canadian books by the Literary Review of Canada in 2017.
 

Sign up for the six week course registration: $63 | Single class: $21
Registration

Thursdays, May 24 – June 28
10:00 AM – 12:00 PM

View Event →
Curious Minds Morning Speaker Series
May
24
10:00 AM10:00

Curious Minds Morning Speaker Series

Join Professor John English at Hot Docs Cinema for an enlightening discussion on Pierre Trudeau's influence on Canada under the wave of "Trudeaumania".

Fifty years ago this spring, Pierre Trudeau became Prime Minister of Canada and Trudeaumania swept the nation. This six-week course will take you on an unforgettable journey through the life and times of the Canadian icon. We’ll relive the political excitement of the 1960s and 70s while exploring how and why Trudeau’s image and legacy continue to endure. 
 

The Director of the Bill Graham Centre for Contemporary International History at Trinity College, John English is the author of the two-volume biography Just Watch Me: The Life of Pierre Elliott Trudeau, which was chosen as one of the ten best biographies of the decade in 2010 by Indigo and one of the twenty-five most influential Canadian books by the Literary Review of Canada in 2017.
 

Sign up for the six week course registration: $63 | Single class: $21
Registration

Thursdays, May 24 – June 28
10:00 AM – 12:00 PM

View Event →
Apr
26
6:00 PM18:00

BOOK LAUNCH: GOD SAVE TEXAS: A JOURNEY INTO THE SOUL OF THE LONE STAR STATE, BY LAWRENCE WRIGHT

DESCRIPTION

The Pulitzer Prize-winning author of The Looming Tower explores the history, culture, and politics of Texas, while holding the stereotypes up for rigorous scrutiny.

Lawrence Wright is a staff writer for The New Yorker, and the author of nine books. The Looming Tower: Al-Qaeda and the Road to 9/11 won the Lionel Gelber Award for Nonfiction and the Pulitzer Prise for General Nonfiction. His most recent book, Thirteen Days in September: Carter, Begin, and Sadat at Camp David, was named by Publisher’s Weekly one of the top ten books of the year.

This event is part of the “Books that Matter” series, sponsored by the Bill Graham Centre for Contemporary International History.

Register here.

View Event →
Going Nuclear: A Symposium on American Nuclear Politics
Apr
12
8:30 AM08:30

Going Nuclear: A Symposium on American Nuclear Politics

At the heart of American nuclear power lies a paradox: Although the United States participated in and propelled a nuclear arms race, no other country has expended more resources in seeking to limit the proliferation of nuclear weapons. Why did the United States pour energy into arms control, disarmament, and non-proliferation agreements, in an effort to limit the very weapons it relied upon so heavily? Why does it continue this pattern today? Timothy Andrews Sayle, the Bissell-Heyd Research Faculty Fellow, has convened a symposium to discuss and explore the past, present, and future of U.S. nuclear proliferation and non-proliferation policy. Historians, political scientists, and practitioners will explore American policy over time and place, including discussion of U.S. nonproliferation policy in NATO, the United Nations, and in key regional areas: the Middle East, South Asia, and the Korean Peninsula.

Morning Panel 1: Institutions

Katie Davis, University of Toronto
Susie Colbourn, University of Toronto Ambassador
Paul Meyer, The Simons Foundation Professor
Tom Nichols, U.S. Naval War College

Morning Panel 2: Regions

Professor Jayita Sarkar, Boston University
Dr. John S. Park, Harvard University
Dr. Farzan Sabet, Graduate Institute Geneva

Keynote

Francis J. Gavin, Giovanni Agnelli Distinguished Professor and the Inaugural Director of the Henry A. Kissinger Center for Global Affairs at Johns Hopkins SAIS

Francis J. Gavin is the Giovanni Agnelli Distinguished Professor and the Inaugural Director of the Henry A. Kissinger Center for Global Affairs at Johns Hopkins SAIS. In 2013, Gavin was appointed the first Frank Stanton Chair in Nuclear Security Policy Studies and Professor of Political Science at MIT. Before joining MIT, he was the Tom Slick Professor of International Affairs and the Director of the Robert S. Strauss Center for International Security and Law at the University of Texas. From 2005 until 2010, he directed The American Assembly’s multiyear, national initiative, The Next Generation Project: U.S. Global Policy and the Future of International Institutions. Gavin’s writings include Gold, Dollars, and Power: The Politics of International Monetary Relations, 1958-1971 (University of North Carolina Press, 2004) and Nuclear Statecraft: History and Strategy in America’s Atomic Age (Cornell University Press, 2012). He received a PhD and MA in History from the University of Pennsylvania, a Master of Studies in Modern European History from Oxford University, and a BA in Political Science from the University of Chicago. Gavin is an Associate of the Managing the Atom Program at the Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs at Harvard University, Senior Fellow of the Clements Program in History, Strategy, and Statecraft, a Distinguished Scholar at the Robert S. Strauss Center, a Senior Advisor to the Nuclear Proliferation International History Project at the Woodrow Wilson Center, and a life-member of the Council on Foreign Relations.

There are two separate registration lists for this event: Morning Symposium and Afternoon Keynote presentation. For the morning symposium, please register here >> https://munkschool.utoronto.ca/csus/event/24282/ For the afternoon keynote by Prof. Francis J. Gavin, register here >> https://munkschool.utoronto.ca/csus/event/25193/

View Event →
The Biggest Victory for the Contras, Yet’: Hurricane Joan and the Cold War Debate over Natural Disaster Relief Aid
Mar
15
4:00 PM16:00

The Biggest Victory for the Contras, Yet’: Hurricane Joan and the Cold War Debate over Natural Disaster Relief Aid

GRADUATE RESEARCH FORUM 2017-2018

Featuring Andrew Brown (Texas A&M University)

On January 16, 2010, after a 7.0 magnitude earthquake demolished Haiti, President Barack Obama appeared in the White House rose garden with former presidents Bill Clinton and George W. Bush. He announced a historic disaster relief package to Haiti, demonstrating that humanitarian aid was a duty that transcended politics and parties. Celebrities and citizens from around the world donated to efforts to rebuild the country, showing how relief efforts could unite a world together for a common cause. This unified vision has not always been the case. Disaster relief during the Cold War, rather than unite peoples, magnified the deep divisions in the United States over the purpose of foreign aid and the role of the United States in the world.

Hurricane Joan hit the Atlantic coast of Nicaragua in October 1988. The hurricane resulted in death or injury to hundreds of Nicaraguans. Hundreds of thousands of Nicaraguans were forced to flee their homes. The port of Bluefields was hit the hardest and resulted in severe damages to the region’s infrastructure. The context of the hurricane made its impact so important. The Sandinistas and Contras had fought against each other since the early 1980s. The United States funded the Contra war effort, though the Boland Amendment limited Reagan’s commitment. The war and American embargo decimated the Nicaraguan economy and forced a significant labor shortage in the country. This economic reality left Nicaragua very vulnerable. The effect of Hurricane Joan hurt the Sandinistas considerably and became, as one American official claimed, “The biggest victory for the Contras, yet.” The question for many observers became, would foreign aid from America be used as a tool of war or a tool of humanity?

This paper investigates the debate over the use of disaster relief aid toward Nicaragua after Hurricane Joan. President Ronald Reagan elected to refuse aid to Nicaragua, citing his belief that the Nicaraguan government would squander the money. Many domestic and international observers condemned this decision, including members of the American left, the United Nations, and Puerto Rican independence activists. This opposition sparked a heated debate over the obligation of the United States to the world. This article outlines the decision-making processes, tactics used, and rhetoric utilized by both sides of the debate to illuminate what disaster relief meant to various groups during the Cold War. Furthermore, it explores government-civil society relations and how each side influences the actions of the other.

About Andrew Brown

Andrew Brown is a PhD student in the Department of History at Texas A&M University. His research interests include US-Third World relations, environmental history, the history of science, the history of foreign aid and natural disasters, and citizen diplomacy. His dissertation is a history of the Smithsonian-Peace Corps Environmental Program, which sent hundreds of scientists to solve environmental crises in the developing world. This research provides a new narrative of the role scientists play in American foreign relations. When he is not dedicating his time to school, Andrew enjoys watching movies, traveling, cooking, and being disappointed by his favorite sports teams.

View Event →
Mar
5
7:00 PM19:00

Book Launch - Toward a Better World: Memoirs of a Life in International and Development Economics

  • Bloor - 1st floor Boardroom/Round Room/Library (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Towards a Better World describes the life, times and perspectives of Gerry Helleiner, a Canadian activist and university-based economist, who worked for roughly 40 years with developing countries and international organizations. In his memoir, Towards a Better World, Helleiner recounts the profound early experiences in Africa that propelled him into a rewarding career devoted to research, advice and teaching in international economics, economic development and global poverty reduction.

Join Gerry Helleiner, in dialogue with Antoinette Handley of the University of Toronto Department of Political Science, as he discusses the experiences and insights behind his new book. Introductory remarks by Stephen Lewis. Books for purchase and refreshments available.

View Event →
Feb
26
8:30 AM08:30

The North Korean Nuclear Challenge

  • Seeley Hall in Trinity College, University of Toronto (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Conference Theme

North Korea’s recent spate of nuclear tests coupled with rising tensions between the Kim regime and the Trump administration has raised the specter of nuclear war on the Korean Peninsula and beyond. This high-level conference, featuring leading experts and policy-makers, explores the different dimensions of this evolving crisis and potential strategies to address it.

Conference Agenda

Registration (8:30am – 9:00am)

Coffee and Light Breakfast Served

Welcome (9:00am – 9:05am)

  • Mayo Moran, Professor of Law, University of Toronto and Provost and Vice-Chancellor of Trinity College, University of Toronto

Opening Remarks (9:05am – 9:15am)

  • Hon. William C. Graham, Founder of Bill Graham Centre for Contemporary International History and Board Chair of the Canadian International Council

Opening Address (9:15am – 10:00am)
“Canada’s Role and the Vancouver Foreign Minister’s Meeting on Korea”

  • Ian Shugart, Deputy Minister of Foreign Affairs,  Global Affairs Canada

Coffee (10:00am – 10:15am)

Panel 1: The Nature of the North Korean Threat (10:15am – 12:00pm)

Panelists:

  • Charles K. Armstrong, The Korea Foundation Professor of Korean Studies in the Social Sciences, Columbia University
  • Andre Schmid, Associate Professor and Chair of the Department of East Asia Studies, University of Toronto
  • Jenny Town, Assistant Director of the US-Korea Institute at the Johns Hopkins School of Advanced International Studies (SAIS)
  • Adam Mount, Senior Fellow & Director, Defense Posture Project, Federation of American Scientists

Moderator: Don Rickerd, Munk School of Global Affairs, University of Toronto

Lunch (12:00pm – 1:00pm)

Panel Two: US-Korea Relations (1:00pm – 2:45pm)

Panelists:

  • Scott A. Snyder, Senior Fellow for Korea Studies and Director of the Program on U.S.-Korea Policy, Council on Foreign Relations
  • George A. Lopez, Rev. Theodore M. Hesburgh, C.S.C., Professor Emeritus of Peace Studies, Kroc Institute, University of Notre Dame
  • Lt. General (R) In-Bum Chun, Republic of Korea Armed Forces
  • Kyung-Ae Park, The Korea Foundation Chair, School of Public Policy and Global Affairs, University of British Colombia; and Director, Canada-DPRK Knowledge Partnership Program

Moderator: Jack Cunningham, Interim Director, Bill Graham Centre for Contemporary International History

Coffee (2:45pm – 3:00pm)

Panel Three: Future Prospects (3:00pm – 4:45pm)

Panelists:

  • Andrea Berger, Senior Research Associate and Senior Program Manager at the James Martin Center for Non-Proliferation Studies and Senior Fellow at the Canadian International Council
  • James Fergusson, Deputy Director or the Centre for Defence and Security Studies, University of Manitoba
  • Patrick McEachern, International Affairs Fellow at the Council on Foreign Relations and Public Policy Fellow at the Wilson Centre

Moderator: Mark Sedra, President, Canadian International Council

Closing Remarks (4:45pm – 5:00pm)

  • Stephen Wallace, Distinguished Fellow, Canadian International Council

Organizers & Sponsors

Sponsors:
Global Affairs Canada

Organizers:
The Canadian International Council
The Bill Graham Centre for Contemporary International History

Speaker Bios

Charles K. Armstrong is The Korea Foundation Professor of Korean Studies in the Social Sciences in the Department of History at Columbia University. Professor Armstrong’s teaching and research interests include modern Korean history, East Asian international history, US-East Asian relations and world history. He is the author, editor or co-editor of several books, including The KoreasTyranny of the Weak: North Korea and the World, 1950 – 1992Korea at the Center: Dynamics of Regionalism in Northeast Asia; Korean Society: Civil Society, Democracy and the State; and The North Korean Revolution, 1945 – 1950. His current research and publication projects include a history of modern East Asia (forthcoming from Wiley-Blackwell), American cultural policy in East Asia during the Cold War, and the interaction between urbanization and the environment in North Korea and Northeast China.

Andrea Berger is a London-based Senior Research Associate at the Middlebury Institute of International Studies (MIIS), specializing in nuclear weapons policy, sanctions and proliferation finance, and Northeast Asian security issues. As part of her work, Andrea conducts detailed investigations into illicit networks using open-source intelligence techniques, in support of counterproliferation efforts. She is a co-host of the Arms Control Wonk podcast, a Senior Fellow at the Canadian International Council, and a Visiting Fellow at King’s College London. Prior to joining MIIS, Andrea was the Deputy Director of the nuclear policy team at the Royal United Services Institute (RUSI), the UK’s leading defence and security think-tank. She also directed the UK Project on Nuclear Issues, a network of over 1000 nuclear professionals in the UK. Between 2012 and 2015, Andrea led track one-and-a-half security talks with the North Korean People’s Army and Worker’s Party, both in Pyongyang and London. She has worked extensively with the Financial Action Task Force and its regional bodies, as well as with financial institutions, to develop their approaches to countering proliferation finance. Andrea has been a delegate to the Proliferation Security Initiative’s Operational Experts Group, as well as a UK representative at the 2014 and 2016 P5 Conferences. Before joining the nonproliferation community, Andrea worked in several Canadian government departments, lastly as a Trade Policy Analyst in Global Affairs Canada.

Lt. General In-Bum Chun (retired) was born on 6 September 1958. Spending his early years in Seoul he moved to the United States at the age of 7, following his mother who was the first woman diplomat for the Republic of Korea (ROK). LTG(R) Chun spent four and a half years in New York City and returned to Korea in 1969. He was accepted to the Korea Military Academy (KMA) in 1977. LTG(R) Chun was selected to become the aide to LTG Lee, Ki-Baek who was then the 1st ROK Corps Commander. LTG(R) Chun became the youngest officer in ROK Army history to be an aide to a three star general with the rank of lieutenant. In 1983 General Lee, as Chairman of the ROK Joint Chiefs of Staff, was a victim of the Rangoon bombing. LTG(R) Chun was credited with saving General Lee’s life and was awarded the National Security Medal (Kwang-Bok). Upon completion of Regimental command, LTG(R) Chun was assigned as the Chief of the Election Support Branch, Civil Military Affairs /Strategic Operations Directorate at the Multi National Forces (MNF) in Iraq. He was recognized by both the Republic of Korea and the United States for his contribution to the first “Fair and Free” elections in Iraq on 30 January 2005, with the Hwa-Rang Combat medal and the US Bronze Star medal. From November of 2005, LTG(R) Chun served as the Director of US Affairs at the Korean Ministry of National Defense and was involved in negotiations and cooperation with the US on relocations of US forces, Camp returns, ROK/US Joint Vision Study, Special Measures Agreement and transition of Wartime Operational Control. On 19 July 2007, 23 Korean missionary workers, including 16 women, were kidnapped by the Taliban. LTG(R) Chun was given seven hours’ notice to assemble a team and deploy to the International Security Assistance Force (ISAF) HQ in Kabul, Afghanistan and establish coordinating relations with ISAF and also to support the ROKG efforts for the release of the hostages. The incident lasted for forty four days and all but two were released unharmed. LTG(R) Chun was credited with accomplishing his mission successfully and was awarded the Korean Presidential citation. Upon completion of his duties as the Deputy-director for Strategic Planning at ROK JCS, LTG(R) Chun took over the OPCON Transition Group, which was charged with the responsibility of overseeing the transformation of wartime operational control from the US to the ROK. During his post he supervised establishment of the Initial Operational Capability of the ROK JCS and subordinate operational commands. LTG(R) Chun was promoted to two stars on 3 Nov of 2009 and took over command of the 27th Infantry Division. In Nov of 2013, he was promoted to Lieutenant General and was assigned as the commander of the ROK Special Warfare Command. From April of 2015, he was the Deputy Commander for the First ROK Army. LTG(R) Chun retired from active duty as of 31 July 2016. After reirement he conducted concurrent fellowships with Brookings Institute and the US-Korea Institute, School of Advances International Studies (SAIS), Johns Hopkins University in Washington DC until October 2017.

Jack Cunningham has a BA in English and an MA in History from the University of Calgary and a PhD in History from the University of Toronto. His dissertation dealt with Anglo-American nuclear relations in the late 1950s and early ’60s, and his research interests include American, British, and Canadian foreign policy and international relations, particularly for the Cold War period. He has been Program Coordinator of the Graham Centre since 2011 and is currently the Centre’s Interim Director. His publications include coedited volumes on the conflict in Afghanistan and the 2003 invasion of Iraq. He is also coeditor of International Journal, Canada’s leading journal of international affairs.

Dr. James Fergusson is a Professor in the Department of Political Studies and Senior Research Fellow in the Centre for Defence and Security Studies. He teaches a range of courses in the fields of international relations, strategic studies, Canada-US defence relations, and Canadian Foreign and Defence Policy. His recent publications include Beyond Afghanistan: A Future Security Agenda for Canada co-edited with Francis Furtado (Vancouver: UBC Press, 2016); Left of Bang: North American Maritime Domain Awareness and NORAD”s Maritime Early Warning Missions co-authored with Andrea Charron and Nicholas Allarie (Centre for Defence and Security Studies, 2015); NORAD in Perpituity, co-authored with Andrea Charron (Centre for Defence and Security Studies, 2015)“The NORAD Conundrum: Canada, missile defence and military space” International Journal. 70:2. June 2015; Perspectives of Muslim-Faith, Ethno-Cultural Community Based and Student Organizations in Countering Domestic Terrorism in Canada, co-authored with Kawser Ahmed and Alexander Salt (TSAS, 2014); “Ballistic Missile Defence: NATO’s European Phased Adaptive Approach” Atlantisch Perspectief. 4: 2013; “The Right Debate: Airpower, the Future of War, Canada’s Strategic Interests and the F-35 Decision.” Canadian Foreign Policy Journal, Winter 2012; Canada and Ballistic Missile Defence 1954-2009: Déjà vu all over again, Canadian War Museum Military History Series. Vancouver: University of British Columbia Press, 2010. Dr. Fergusson is currently the H. Col, for 2 Canadian Air Division in Winnipeg.

William C. Graham: First elected as Member of Parliament for Toronto-Centre-Rosedale in 1993, Bill Graham served as Minister of Foreign Affairs from January 2002 until July 2004 and Minister of National Defence from July 2004 until January 2006.  In February 2006, he was appointed leader of the Official Opposition and interim leader of the Liberal Party of Canada, positions he served until December 2006. From 1995 to 2002, Mr. Graham served as chairman of the Standing Committee of the House of Commons on Foreign Affairs and International Trade. Active in international parliamentary associations, Mr. Graham was elected founding president of the Inter-Parliamentary Forum of the Americas. He has served as vice president and treasurer of the Parliamentary Association of the Organization for Security and Co-operation in Europe, and as treasurer of Liberal International. In 2014, he was appointed Member of the Order of Canada. Prior to his election to parliament, Mr. Graham practiced law at Fasken & Calvin, specializing in civil litigation and international business transactions, and served on the board of directors of various public and private Canadian corporations. Subsequently, he taught international trade law, public international law, and the law of the European Community at the University of Toronto, Faculty of Law. A past president of the Alliance française de Toronto, Mr. Graham has been recognized for his contributions to French language and culture in Ontario by being appointed a Chevalier de la Légion d’honneur and Chevalier de l’Ordre de la Pléiade. He is currently Chair of the Board at the Canadian International Council.

George A. Lopez is the Hesburgh Professor of Peace Studies Emeritus at the Kroc Institute, University of Notre Dame. For the past 30 years he has researched and advised on economic sanctions, peacebuilding, the United Nations and various peace related issues. His work in these areas has taken him to 20 countries. From September 2013 – July 2015 Lopez served as the Vice President of the Academy for International Conflict Management and Peacebuilding at the United States Institute of Peace, Washington, DC. From October 2010 through July 2011, he served on the United Nations Panel of Experts for monitoring and implementing UN Sanctions on North Korea. Since 1992, Lopez has advised various international agencies and governments regarding sanctions issues, ranging from limiting their humanitarian impact to the design of targeted financial sanctions. He has written 35 articles and book chapters, as well as written authored/ edited six books [often with David Cortright], including The Sanctions Decade: Assessing UN Strategies in the 1990s and Putting Teeth in the Tiger: Improving the Effectiveness of Arms Embargoes [with Michael Brzoska]. Lopez-Cortright research detailing the unlikely presence of WMDs in Iraq appeared before the war in “Disarming Iraq” in Arms Control Today [Sept 2002] and then after the war in “Containing Iraq: the Sanctions Worked” in Foreign Affairs [July/August 2004]. He is bringing to a close a major research project with United Nations University entitled The Sanctions Enterprise: Assessing a Quarter-Century of UN Action for Peace, Security and Human Rights. From May-December 1997, he served as interim executive director of the Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists, and then chaired its Board of Directors until June 2003, presiding over the moving of the hands of The Doomsday Clock in 2002.

Dr. Patrick McEachern is a Council on Foreign Relations International Affairs Fellow in residence at the Wilson Center in Washington, DC.  He is co-author of North Korea, Iran, and the Challenge to International Order (Routledge, 2017) and author of Inside the Red Box: North Korea’s Post-totalitarian Politics (Columbia University Press, 2010).  He is currently working on a new co-authored book entitled Survivor: North Korea from Kim Il Sung to Kim Jong Un.  His other publications can be found in the Journal of East Asian StudiesAsian SurveyKorea Yearbook, and elsewhere.  He has been a Foreign Service Officer since 2002, serving in Tokyo, Seoul, Washington, DC, and Bratislava, Slovakia.  He speaks Korean and Slovak.  Patrick received his PhD in Political Science from Louisiana State University.

Dr. Adam Mount, Ph.D. is Senior Fellow & Director of the Defense Posture Project at the Federation of American Scientists, where his work covers U.S. nuclear strategy and force structure, global nuclear politics, deterrence, and North Korea. Previously, he was a Senior Fellow at the Center for American Progress and a Stanton Nuclear Security Fellow at the Council on Foreign Relations (CFR). In 2015-16, he directed the CFR Independent Task Force on U.S. Policy Toward North Korea, a group of seventeen experts chaired by Adm. Mike Mullen and Sen. Sam Nunn. Their report, A Sharper Choice on North Korea: Engaging China for a Stable Northeast Asia issued ten findings and six recommendations for the next president’s policy toward the regime. Dr. Mount’s other writing has been published by Foreign Affairs, The Atlantic, Survival, Democracy, and other outlets, and he is a columnist at the Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists. His analysis has been cited in The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, The Washington Post, Politico, AFP, AP, and Reuters, and he has appeared on CNN, CBS, BBC, MSNBC, and CNBC programs. He has testified before the House Armed Services subcommittee on strategic forces. He holds a Ph.D. and M.A. from the Department of Government at Georgetown University, and a B.A. from Reed College.

Professor Kyung-Ae Park holds the Korea Foundation Chair at the School of Public Policy and Global Affairs of the University of British Columbia. She serves as the Director of the Canada-DPRK Knowledge Partnership Program (KPP), a program she established in 2010, and also as the Co-Director of the Center for Korean Research.  The KPP has been hosting six North Korean professors each year since 2011 for six-month periods of study at UBC, as part of a long-term knowledge sharing and academic exchange and thus represents an unprecedented, ground-breaking program in North America. She is a former president of the Association of Korean Political Studies in North America. She is the author, coauthor, and editor of many scholarly publications on issues ranging from North and South Korean politics and foreign relations to gender and development.  Notable publications include Non-Traditional Security Issues in North KoreaNorth Korea in Transition: Politics, Economics, and SocietyNew Challenges of North Korean Foreign PolicyKorean Security Dynamics in Transition, and China and North Korea: Politics of Integration and Modernization.  She has also authored articles in a number of journals, including Comparative PoliticsJournal of Asian StudiesPacific AffairsAsian Survey, and Pacific Review. Since the mid-1990s, she has made many trips to Pyongyang and hosted North Korean delegation visits to Canada, playing a key role in promoting track II exchanges and diplomacy between the two countries.

Donald S. Rickerd, C.M., Q.C. is a graduate of Queen’s University, Balliol College, Oxford, and Osgoode Hall Law School. He practiced law in Toronto, taught at York University, and was President of the Donner Canadian Foundation in Toronto, the W.H. Donner Foundation in New York, and the Max Bell Foundation in Toronto. He served for four years on the Royal Commission on Certain Activities of the RCMP, and is currently a Senior Fellow at Massey College at the University of Toronto and a Counsellor in the International Relations Program at the Munk School of Global Affairs.858&action=edit

Professor Andre Schmid is Chair and Associate Professor in the Dept. of East Asian Studies, University of Toronto. His book Korea Between Empires, 1895-1919 was winner of the John Whitney Hall award of the Association of Asian Studies for outstanding book of the year. He is currently working on a book on the reconstruction of North Korea after the Korean war, entitled Socialist Living in North Korea, 1953-1965. He has a forthcoming article on the historiography of North Korea in the April issue of American Historical Review and has published widely in North America and Asian academic journals.

Dr. Mark Sedra: Over the past decade, Mark’s research has focused on peace building and state building processes in fragile and conflict-affected states. He has conducted research on several countries and regions, including Afghanistan, Northern Ireland, the Middle East and the Balkans. Mark has been a consultant to governments, intergovernmental organizations, and NGOs, including the United Nations, Global Affairs Canada and the UK Department for International Development. In 2012, Mark founded the Security Governance Group, a private research consulting firm, and the Centre for Security Governance, a non-profit think tank, both of which specialize in international peace and security issues. He is also currently an Adjunct Assistant Professor at the University of Waterloo and Balsillie School of International Affairs. Mark has held a variety of positions in the international affairs field both in Canada and globally, including: Senior Researcher and Program Leader at the Centre for International Governance Innovation; Cadieux-Léger Fellow at Global Affairs Canada; Visiting Research Fellow at the Defence Academy of the United Kingdom; and Researcher and Project Manager at the Bonn International Centre for Conversion. He has published widely and is a regular commentator on security issues in the Canadian and international press. His most recent book, Security Sector Reform in Conflict-Affected Countries: The Evolution of a Model, was published by Routledge in the fall of 2016.

Scott A. Snyder is senior fellow for Korea studies and director of the program on U.S.-Korea policy at the Council on Foreign Relations (CFR). His program examines South Korea’s efforts to contribute on the international stage; its potential influence and contributions as a middle power in East Asia; and the peninsular, regional, and global implications of North Korean instability. Mr. Snyder is the author of South Korea at the Crossroads: Autonomy and Alliance in an Era of Rival Powers (January 2018) and coauthor of The Japan-South Korea Identity Clash: East Asian Security and the United States (May 2015) with Brad Glosserman. He is also the coeditor of North Korea in Transition: Politics, Economy, and Society (October 2012), and the editor of Global Korea: South Korea’s Contributions to International Security (October 2012) and The U.S.-South Korea Alliance: Meeting New Security Challenges(March 2012). Mr. Snyder served as the project director for CFR’s Independent Task Force on policy toward the Korean Peninsula. He currently writes for the blog Asia Unbound.

Jenny Town is the Assistant Director of the US-Korea Institute at the Johns Hopkins School of Advanced International Studies (SAIS) and manages programs on North Korea, nuclear weapons, nuclear energy, US-ROK alliance and Northeast Asia regional security. She is the Managing Editor and Producer of “38 North,” a web-journal providing analysis of events in and around the DPRK–from social evolution to political developments to WMD. She is an expert reviewer for Freedom House’s Freedom in the World Index, where she previously worked on the Human Rights in North Korea project. And she is also an Associate Fellow at the Foreign Policy Institute at Johns Hopkins SAIS, a Senior Fellow for Korea Studies at the America Foreign Policy Council, an Associate Member of the Council of Korean Americans, and a Member of the National Committee on North Korea.

Prior to working in Korean affairs, she was the Communications Director for Peace X Peace; the Director of the Washington (DC) Office/Special Projects Manager for Government Relations at the College Board; and a Project Manager at Clarity Coverdale Fury Advertising, Inc. She sits on the Board of Directors of the Melton Foundation and the Editorial Board for Inkstick.

Stephen Wallace grew up in Halifax and Ottawa, studied the arts and business administration, and has focused much of his career on international affairs and public administration. His early work as a teacher, volunteer, diplomat and aid worker concentrated mainly on Africa and Latin America. Mr. Wallace spent many years with the Canadian International Development Agency, serving in turn as vice-president of the Policy Branch and Afghanistan Task Force. His public policy assignments included the Special Joint Committee of Parliament Reviewing Canadian Foreign Policy, as well as work on civil society with the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development. As a senior public servant, Mr. Wallace also served as assistant secretary of the Treasury Board Secretariat and associate deputy minister for the Department of Canadian Heritage. Stephen Wallace was Secretary to the Governor General and Secretary General of the Order of Canada from 2011 to 2017. He is currently a Distinguished Fellow of the Canadian International Council, Senior Fellow of Massey College, and a board member of several corporations and non-government institutions.

View Event →
The European Origins of the Collapse of Bretton Woods
Feb
15
4:00 PM16:00

The European Origins of the Collapse of Bretton Woods

  • Gerald Larkin Building, Room 200 (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

GRADUATE RESEARCH FORUM 2017-2018

Featuring Michael de Groot (University of Virginia) 

This talk examines the Western European contributions to the collapse of the Bretton Woods international monetary system in the late 1960s and early 1970s. Highlighting Washington’s inability to control inflation and rectify its deficits, scholars have assigned blame to the Nixon administration for the unraveling of the fixed-exchange rate system. Drawing on archival evidence in Britain, Germany, the Netherlands, and the United States, this research challenges this scholarly consensus. The weakness of the U.S. dollar was only part of the story; the weakness of the British pound and the strength of the West German mark and Dutch guilder undermined the system as well. Michael De Groot will illuminate how decisions in London, Bonn, and The Hague to float their respective currencies at various points from 1967 to 1973 betrayed the rigidity of Bretton Woods, making it easier for the Nixon administration to advocate floating exchange rates. Financial globalization and the explosion of the Euromarket in the 1960s created highly-mobile capital that could be used to speculate against the future values of under- or overvalued currencies, a development that spread inflation across borders. Speculators feared that currencies such as the dollar and the pound were overvalued, and they transferred their money into stronger currencies such as the mark and the guilder in anticipation of a revaluation. This placed upward pressure on prices in countries such as West Germany and the Netherlands, forcing them to untether their currencies from the system in an effort to stem the inflationary tide of capital. Despite the widespread desire among Western European policymakers to maintain Bretton Woods, their decisions to float ironically reinforced speculators’ inclinations to anticipate revaluations and devaluations. This development crippled Bretton Woods, providing the necessary ammunition for the Nixon administration to end the system by spring 1973.

About Michael De Groot

Michael De Groot is a PhD candidate in international history at the University of Virginia. He is currently in residence at Yale University as the Henry A. Kissinger predoctoral fellow at the Johnson Center for the Study of American Diplomacy, and a National Dissertation Completion Fellow at the University of Virginia’s Jefferson Scholars Program. Drawing on archival research in Austria, Britain, France, Germany, the Netherlands, Russia, and the United States, his dissertation examines the effects of accelerating economic globalization on the foreign policies of the great powers during the 1970s. By recasting the decade in terms of globalization rather than the Cold War, his research demonstrates how the socialist East and capitalist West – often depicted in terms of their stark ideological differences – had to reshape their strategic priorities to account for disruption in the global economy. His research has been supported by the Society for Historians of American Foreign Relations, the Gerald R. Ford Presidential Foundation, and the Thomas Jefferson Memorial Foundation, among others. He received a B.A. in history with departmental honors from Stanford University.

View Event →
Harnessing Investment in the North American Arctic
Feb
14
to Feb 15

Harnessing Investment in the North American Arctic

Arctic 360, in collaboration with the Bill Graham Centre for Contemporary International History, the Wilson Center's Polar Initiative and Munk School of Global Affairs, invites you to the inaugural Arctic investment conference. 

The global geopolitics and economics of the Arctic is undergoing intense transformation. Despite global attention to the opening of a new blue ocean and the possibilities of a host of new resource development, up to now, infrastructure from roads, to housing, ports, SAR, fibre optic cable and other necessary components of a vibrant economy have been unevenly developed throughout the Arctic at best if not lacking in its entirety. The successful growth of the emerging North American economy requires insightful pan- Arctic thinking. It also requires new theoretical and applied economic approaches toward harnessing and carrying out investment in the region. Central to that success is the active and informed role of northern stakeholders, northern decision-makers, northern rights holders, and northern business leaders in determining the future of the region.

It is with this foundation that Arctic 360 in collaboration with the Bill Graham Centre for Contemporary History, the Munk School of Global Affairs, University of Toronto and the Wilson Center’s Polar Initiative, D.C. will host the opportunity for leading minds and players in the financial sector to discuss ways forward for successful Arctic investment and development. 

Date
Wednesday February 14th
Thursday February 15th

Time
Start: 8:00am Registration/Continental breakfast
End: 5:30pm 

Venue
Seeley Hall, St. George Campus
University of Toronto
6 Hoskin Avenue
Toronto, ON  M5S 1H8
* Wheelchair accessible

Agenda
Please click HERE for a full conference agenda.

 

View Event →
Jan
24
5:00 PM17:00

Artificial Intelligence in International Law and Relations

  • Bloor - 1st floor Boardroom/Round Room/Library (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

In the age of drone warfare and the weaponization of codes, it is timely to consider the implications of Artificial Intelligence (AI) for international law and relations. Join Jean-Gabriel Castel, Distinguished Professor Emeritus and Senior Scholar at Osgoode Hall Law School, for a lecture and discussion. Light refreshments provided.

About the speaker:

Jean-Gabriel Castel, O.C., O.Ont., Q.C., L.S.M., Officier de la Légion d’Honneur, B.Sc., Lic. Droit (Paris I, Panthéon-Sorbonne), J.D. (Mich.), S.J.D. (Harv.), Docteur hon. causa (Aix-Marseille), fellow of the Royal Society of Canada, Academy of Social Sciences, associate member of the International Academy of Comparative Law, member of the Académie du Var (France), former editor of the Canadian Bar Review and a Distinguished Research Professor emeritus at Osgoode Hall Law School of York University.

He has focused his career on emerging topics in both public and private international law and international business law. He is also a world-renowned international arbitrator having participated to many important business disputes spanning multiple jurisdictions, legal systems and cultures. He has lectured in many universities around the world and published several books and articles dealing with topical subjects pertaining to law, international business and artificial intelligence.

View Event →
The State Department, University of Utah and the Making of a National University for Ethiopia, 1958 to 1969
Jan
18
4:00 PM16:00

The State Department, University of Utah and the Making of a National University for Ethiopia, 1958 to 1969

  • Gerald Larkin Building, Room 200 (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

GRADUATE RESEARCH FORUM 2017-2018

Featuring Manna Duah (Temple University) 

This talk examines the University of Utah’s mandate between 1959 and 1969 to run higher education programs for Ethiopia. The US State Department’s Agency for International Development (AID) hired the University of Utah at the request of the Ethiopian Emperor, Haile Selassie I, to develop a national university for Ethiopia. Manna Duah argues that the university’s international education program for Ethiopia was a US foreign policy instrument. The program was to support and strengthen the burgeoning US-Ethiopia alliance. It provided funds for the Imperial Government’s ambitions to improve national literacy and have a regional educational center with international connections. The Utah program also sought to identify and train Ethiopian students who showed potential to become political leaders. This program created a transnational educational space in Ethiopia and the US that connected students at the Haile Selassie University to the larger network of student migrations who interpreted and disseminated the political and social models they encountered through US programs.

As part of the dissertation’s larger focus on US international education programs in Africa, this research contributes to a growing body of literature on the geopolitical implications of Cold War student migrations. Duah’s dissertation focuses on two US Cold War foreign policies in Africa– the alliance with Ethiopia and South Africa, and international education programs designed for young Africans from these countries between 1958 and 1980. US Cold War policy interests created Ethiopia and South Africa as the main US allies in Africa. International education was a vital policy instrument designed to realize US policy objectives in Africa, which were to prevent the rise of collectivist nationalism and communism. Her dissertation uses multi-archival research to analyze the evolution of US international education policies; the alliance between the State Department and US University administrators to create and implement education programs in South Africa, Ethiopia and the US for African students; and the effects of these programs on student and state participants.

About Manna Duah

Manna Duah is a History PhD candidate at Temple University in Philadelphia. She studies transnational history, with a focus on twentieth century US-Africa relations. Her dissertation broadly focuses on US Cold War foreign policies towards Africa, and its effects on African political actors from Ethiopia and South Africa. She is generally interested in US foreign policy, black internationalism, student activism, and women’s rights activism in Africa and the US, and the relationship between globalization, modernization, foreign interventionism, state violence, protest and mass democracy in the global south.

View Event →
Dec
7
4:00 PM16:00

Nine ‘Small’ Islands: The Development of China’s South China Sea Islands Claim during the 1930s

Chris Chung (University of Toronto)

Date: Thursday, December 7, 2017, 4:00-6:00 pm

Location: Gerald Larkin Building, Room 200 (15 Devonshire Place)

Based on recent findings in Taiwanese archives, this talk will examine internal Republican Chinese government decision-making in response to France’s annexation of nine features of the Spratly Islands in 1933. Chinese claims to the South China Sea changed over time. These claimed maritime borders were neither stagnant nor perennial, as both the People’s Republic of China (PRC) and the Republic of China (ROC) claim today. Instead, this territoriality was constantly constructed and re-constructed to respond to the political needs of the present. Secondly, various forces beyond executive levels of the ROC government exerted significant influence that determined the final shape of the ROC claim. Meanwhile, confusion plagued executive circles as to where exactly the French-occupied islands were. Finally, the common image of the Chinese state as a neatly unified and monolithic actor dictating its wishes concerning the South China Sea islands needs to be deconstructed. This talk will show how several government organs, factions, and holdovers of warlordism contested each other and with the executive leadership over what the islands claim should be. Their deliberations exerted tremendous influence on the final policy and claim decided upon.

View Event →
Nov
23
4:00 PM16:00

The Evolution of Cyber Campaigns in Russia’s Near Abroad (and Beyond), from the 1990s to the Present

Benjamin Smalley (University of Toronto)

Date: Thursday, November 23, 2017, 4:00-6:00 pm

Location: Natalie Zemon Davis Conference Room (Sidney Smith Hall, Room 2098, 100 St. George Street)

Cyber operations are used by adversaries to achieve political-security objectives in many conflicts, from the overt hostilities of the 1990s in Chechnya and Kosovo to the influence and infrastructure operations in Ukraine and the US seen more recently. Competition in the cyber domain often occurs at levels calculated to avoid retaliation, but occasionally coincides with conventional military deployment. Russia is frequently accused of perpetrating disruptive cyber operations in bordering states, but the challenge of attribution, involvement of non-state actors, and untested norms of international law—particularly the law of armed conflict applied to cyber operations—make it difficult to protect networks, and punish actors responsible for attack. This talk examines the geopolitical conditions that influence the choice to deploy cyber tools, and investigates how these tools have shaped the outcomes of conflict and the overall geopolitical landscape, over the past twenty years in Russia’s near abroad, linking the original conditions with the outcomes of conflict to determine whether or what Russia has gained. Observable changes form the basis for characterizing decision-making about the portfolio of means deployed in conflict, and helps to infer Russian political-security objectives.

View Event →
Nov
7
6:30 PM18:30

A Conversation with Bill Graham

Join the Hon. Bill Graham at the Royal Canadian Military Institute for a conversation about where Canada is going in world affairs. 

The event will take place on Tuesday November 7th at 6:30pm in the Otter Room at 426 University Avenue. Registration is required ($29 + HST and service fee). Light snacks will be provided. 

To register contact Susan Cook at susan.cook@rcmi.org | 416-597-0286 ext 111

View Event →
Nov
1
5:00 PM17:00

Book Launch: Mike's World

On the 60th anniversary of Lester Pearson’s receipt of the Nobel Peace Prize and the 50th anniversary of his departure as Prime Minister, it is time to reassess the man and his actions in the field of international politics. Mike’s World, edited by Asa McKercher and Galen Roger Perras, brings together established and rising scholars to examine various facets of Pearson’s diplomacy and his attitudes to world affairs. Join the editors and several contributors to launch this important re-examination of a Canadian icon. Refreshments included, and books available for purchase. Register online by clicking HERE.

Wednesday November 1, 2017
5:00pm to 7:00pm

315 Bloor Street West
1st Floor Library
University of Toronto, Munk School

Event Contact: Jack Cunningham | stewartjohncunningham@hotmail.com

View Event →
Oct
26
4:00 PM16:00

Make-Believe Empire: Fort Ord’s Mock Vietnamese Village and the Embedding of the US Military in Popular Culture, 1945-1969

Kelsey Kilgore (University of Toronto)

Date: Thursday, October 26, 2017, 4:00-6:00 pm

Location: Natalie Zemon Davis Conference Room (Sidney Smith Hall, Room 2098, 100 St. George Street)

In October 1966, Panorama, the weekly base newspaper at Fort Ord, CA, proudly announced the official opening of its mock Vietnamese village. The buildings and costumes that had been assembled in the months previous were now in use as training devices to simulate, with purported “realism,” the place and people of Vietnam in an essentially arid landscape.  In using this staged area to prepare soldiers for combat until the end of 1969, several questions arise about the relationship between the military and popular entertainment after the Second World War and into the context of Cold War culture and beyond. This talk focuses on these training exercises at Ft. Ord and their rootedness in a longer history of cooperation between Hollywood and the US military. This history reveals how militarism was embedded in popular culture, mythologizing and normalizing the military at a time when the role of the United States as a global power was actively negotiated through combat. The Vietnamese village at Ord presents a crucial case study in understanding this process, and how the military’s normalized presence has continued to pervade mass entertainment, from GI Joe to video games.

 

View Event →
Oct
24
6:00 PM18:00

The Power of the Prime Minister in Canada: Mel Cappe and Patrice Dutil

A Discussion and Book Launch

We host a discussion on Patrice Dutil’s Prime Ministerial Power in Canada: Its Origins Under Macdonald, Laurier and Borden, 1867-1920 (UBC Press) featuring the author and Prof. Mel Cappe, former Clerk of the Privy Council of Canada. How has the PM’s role changed in the last century? Does the argument of a recent centralization of power still hold? To register click HERE.

Tuesday October 24, 2017
5:00pm to 7:00pm

The Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility
1 Devonshire Place
Devonshire Pl. & Hoskin Avenue
University of Toronto, Munk School

Event Contact: Jack Cunningham | stewartjohncunningham@hotmail.com

View Event →
Oct
15
to Dec 31

Future Books that Matter Events

TBC -In our Books that Matter series:  Launches or Discussions of Patrice Dutil’s Prime Ministerial Power in Canada: Its Origins under Macdonald, Laurier, and Borden; A Place in the Sun: Haiti, Haitians, and the Remaking of Quebec, by Sean Mills;  Mike’s World: Lester B. Pearson and Canadian External Affairs, edited by Asa McKercher and Galen Roger Perras; and The Unreliable Nation: Hostile Nature and Technological Failure in the Cold War, by Edward Jones-Imhotep. More information available soon.

View Event →
Oct
12
5:00 PM17:00

Innovation and Adaptation, 1968-1984 & Trudeau’s World: Insiders Reflect on Foreign Policy,Trade, and Defence, 1968-84

Book launch

Innovation and Adaptation, 1968-1984, and Trudeau’s World: Insiders Reflect on Foreign Policy, Trade, and Defence, 1968-84

Thursday, October 12, 2017-09-28 5:00 pm-7:00 pm

October 12, 5-7 pm, we launch Innovation and Adaptation, 1968-1984, by John Hilliker, Mary Halloran, and Greg Donaghy, and Trudeau’s World: Insiders Reflect on Foreign Policy, Tade, and Defence, 1968-84, by Robert Bothwell and J.L. Granatstein, at the Library, Munk School of Global Affairs, 315 Bloor Street West. Books available for purchase. Refreshments available. Register HERE.

View Event →
Oct
12
12:00 PM12:00

Innovation and Adaptation, 1968-1984

Panel discussion on Innovation and Adaptation, 1968-1984

Thursday, October 12, 2017-09-28 12:00 pm-2:00 pm

On October 12, 12-2 pm we will host a panel discussion with Greg Donaghy, Mary Halloran, and Robert Bothwell, chaired by Alexandre Trudeau, on volume three of the official history of the Department of External Affairs, Innovation and Adaptation, 1968-1984, by John Hilliker, Mary Halloran, and Greg Donaghy, at the Library, Munk School of Global Affairs, 315 Bloor Street West. Register HERE.

View Event →
Oct
4
5:00 PM17:00

Why Dissent Matters with William Kaplan and Bob Rae

October 4, 5-7 pm, we launch William Kaplan’s Why Dissent Matters, another in our Books that Matter series, at the Campbell Conference Facility, Munk School of Global Affairs, 1 Devonshire Place, Toronto.  The Honourable Bob Rae will be commentator for this event. Books available for purchase. Please register online by clicking HERE.

View Event →