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Going Nuclear: A Symposium on American Nuclear Politics
Apr
12
8:30 AM08:30

Going Nuclear: A Symposium on American Nuclear Politics

At the heart of American nuclear power lies a paradox: Although the United States participated in and propelled a nuclear arms race, no other country has expended more resources in seeking to limit the proliferation of nuclear weapons. Why did the United States pour energy into arms control, disarmament, and non-proliferation agreements, in an effort to limit the very weapons it relied upon so heavily? Why does it continue this pattern today? Timothy Andrews Sayle, the Bissell-Heyd Research Faculty Fellow, has convened a symposium to discuss and explore the past, present, and future of U.S. nuclear proliferation and non-proliferation policy. Historians, political scientists, and practitioners will explore American policy over time and place, including discussion of U.S. nonproliferation policy in NATO, the United Nations, and in key regional areas: the Middle East, South Asia, and the Korean Peninsula.

Morning Panel 1: Institutions

Katie Davis, University of Toronto
Susie Colbourn, University of Toronto Ambassador
Paul Meyer, The Simons Foundation Professor
Tom Nichols, U.S. Naval War College

Morning Panel 2: Regions

Professor Jayita Sarkar, Boston University
Dr. John S. Park, Harvard University
Dr. Farzan Sabet, Graduate Institute Geneva

Keynote

Francis J. Gavin, Giovanni Agnelli Distinguished Professor and the Inaugural Director of the Henry A. Kissinger Center for Global Affairs at Johns Hopkins SAIS

Francis J. Gavin is the Giovanni Agnelli Distinguished Professor and the Inaugural Director of the Henry A. Kissinger Center for Global Affairs at Johns Hopkins SAIS. In 2013, Gavin was appointed the first Frank Stanton Chair in Nuclear Security Policy Studies and Professor of Political Science at MIT. Before joining MIT, he was the Tom Slick Professor of International Affairs and the Director of the Robert S. Strauss Center for International Security and Law at the University of Texas. From 2005 until 2010, he directed The American Assembly’s multiyear, national initiative, The Next Generation Project: U.S. Global Policy and the Future of International Institutions. Gavin’s writings include Gold, Dollars, and Power: The Politics of International Monetary Relations, 1958-1971 (University of North Carolina Press, 2004) and Nuclear Statecraft: History and Strategy in America’s Atomic Age (Cornell University Press, 2012). He received a PhD and MA in History from the University of Pennsylvania, a Master of Studies in Modern European History from Oxford University, and a BA in Political Science from the University of Chicago. Gavin is an Associate of the Managing the Atom Program at the Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs at Harvard University, Senior Fellow of the Clements Program in History, Strategy, and Statecraft, a Distinguished Scholar at the Robert S. Strauss Center, a Senior Advisor to the Nuclear Proliferation International History Project at the Woodrow Wilson Center, and a life-member of the Council on Foreign Relations.

There are two separate registration lists for this event: Morning Symposium and Afternoon Keynote presentation. For the morning symposium, please register here >> https://munkschool.utoronto.ca/csus/event/24282/ For the afternoon keynote by Prof. Francis J. Gavin, register here >> https://munkschool.utoronto.ca/csus/event/25193/

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US and Canadian Cooperation in the Arctic
Apr
19
8:15 AM08:15

US and Canadian Cooperation in the Arctic

  • Munk School of Global Affairs at the Observatory (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

The Arctic is undergoing dramatic political, social, economic, and physical changes. The changes present both challenges and opportunities for US and Canadian Arctic relations. In a partnership event between the Bill Graham Centre for Contemporary International History and the Woodrow Wilson Centre, leaders across the North American Arctic were brought together to discuss building a future of cooperation in the Arctic region.

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THE OTTAWA PROCESS TWENTY YEARS LATER: The Landmine Treaty, Human Security, And Canada In The Twenty-First Century
Oct
27
to Oct 28

THE OTTAWA PROCESS TWENTY YEARS LATER: The Landmine Treaty, Human Security, And Canada In The Twenty-First Century

On October 27th and 28th the Canadian Landmine Foundation, Bill Graham Centre for Contemporary International History, the Canadian International Council and its partners are proud to present ‘The Ottawa Process Twenty Years Later: The Landmine Treaty, Human Security, and Canada in the Twenty-First Century’ at The Gardiner Museum in Toronto. Speakers from a variety of fields will lend their expertise to help participants understand what the Ottawa Process began twenty years ago and how Canada continues to deal with challenges, both national and international.

We are also pleased to announce that The Hon. Stéphane Dion, Minister of Foreign Affairs, Global Affairs Canada will be delivering our keynote address.

Date and Time
Thursday October 27th
9am to 9pm

Friday October 28th
9am to 4pm

Please see the program below for more details. Note that the schedule is subject to change.

Venue
The Gardiner Museum
111 Queen’s Park
Toronto, ON  M5S 2C7

Event Partners
Bill Graham Centre for Contemporary International History, Canadian Landmine Foundation, Handicap International, Mines Action Canada, Government of Canada, Laurier Centre for Military, Strategic and Disarmament Studies, Academic Council on the United Nations System, Massey College and Trinity College

THURSDAY OCTOBER 27

THE OTTAWA PROCESS: MIRACLE OR MODEL

9:00 REGISTRATION & CONTINENTAL BREAKFAST

10:00-10:30  WELCOME REMARKS

10:30-12:15 HOW THE PROCESS WORKED

Chair: Mark Gwozdecky, Assistant Deputy Minister, International Security, Global Affairs Canada

Jill Sinclair, Executive Director, External Engagement, Canadian Defence Academy.
Canadian negotiator, Ottawa Process
Paul Heinbecker, Former Canadian Ambassador to the United Nations
Norman Hillmer, Professor, Carleton University

12:30-2:00 Lunch with comments from a land mine survivor, Luz Dari Landazuri Segura

2:00 – 2:30   Pavel Hrncir, Ambassador of the Czech Republic to Canada and author

2:30-4:45   THE LEGACY OF THE OTTAWA PROCESS: HUMAN SECURITY AND NON-GOVERNMENTAL ACTORS

Chair: Olivia Fernandes, Canadian Landmine Foundation

Wendy Wong, Director, Trudeau Centre on Peace, Conflict and Justice, Munk School of Global Affairs, Univ. of Toronto.
Paul Hannon, Executive Director, Mines Action Canada
Clare O’ Reilly, Mine Action Development Manager, Handicap International
Megan Burke, Director, ICBL-CMC

7:00-9:00 STATES, SECURITY, AND THE IMPACT OF THE LANDMINE CAMPAIGN AND HUMAN SECURITY

Chair: Ellen Wright, Canadian Landmine Foundation

The Hon. Bill Graham, Chair, Canadian International Council
The Hon. Lloyd Axworthy, Foreign Minister, Canada 1996-2000
Mokhtar Lamani, former Arab League Ambassador to the United Nations

Appreciation: Chris Snyder, Chair, Canadian Landmine Foundation

 

FRIDAY OCTOBER 28

AFTER OTTAWA
HUMAN SECURITY, NON-STATE ACTORS, AND CANADA IN THE NEW CENTURY

 

9:00-10:30 FUTURE CHALLENGES TO HUMAN SECURITY

Opening Welcome: Mayo Moran, Provost Trinity College

Chair: James Appleyard, CEO, Freycinet Ventures

Maria Banda, Faculty of Law, University of Toronto
Nicolas Rouleau, Lawyer/consultant, Toronto
Erin Mooney, Senior Protection Adviser, United Nations, Protection Capacity & Senior Research Associate, Trinity College, University of Toronto

10:45-11:00: BREAK

11:00-12:30  CANADA AND THE POSSIBILITIES OF CHANGE

Chair: Keith Martin, Acting President, Canadian International Council

Robert Bothwell, University of Toronto
Mark Sedra, Security Governance Group
Raj Saini, MP, Member Foreign Affairs and International Development Committee
Paul Meyer, Professor, Simon Fraser University and Co-President, Vancouver Branch, CIC

12:30-2:00 LUNCHEON

2:00-3:00: WHAT CANADIANS THINK OF THE WORLD: A DISCUSSION

Chair: Gerald Wright, Canadian International Council

Michael Adams and Keith Neuman, Environics Institute

3:00 KEYNOTE ADDRESS

Introduction: Hugh Segal, Master of Massey College, University of Toronto
The Hon. Stéphane Dion, Minister of Foreign Affairs, Global Affairs Canada

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Regional Governments in International Affairs: Lessons from the Arctic
Sep
18
9:00 AM09:00

Regional Governments in International Affairs: Lessons from the Arctic

The Arctic is gaining the attention of national governments around the world. Indeed, countries as diverse as Switzerland, Mongolia, and Turkey have sought observer status at the Arctic Council as one expression of their Arctic interests. Much of the dialogue about circumpolar governance over the last few years has been focusing on how these non-Arctic voices will shape, change, or contribute to the Arctic agenda. Perhaps, this focus has led us to miss something – what is the role of the regional governments from within the Arctic in shaping the international Arctic agenda?

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Polanyi Conference on Science and Social Responsibility
Nov
15
1:00 PM13:00

Polanyi Conference on Science and Social Responsibility

The inaugural Polanyi Conference presents an exceptional opportunity to hear Dr. John C. Polanyi speak and to engage in a meaningful and informed discussion about nuclear weapons as they relate to Canadian society. The Nobel Laureate in Chemistry and tireless public intellectual will be joined by experts from diverse backgrounds to discuss the role of nuclear weapons in the 21st century. Professor Polanyi’s efforts to inform and influence the Canadian public on key social issues in the sciences have largely inspired this conference, which will be an annual event reflecting on a wide range of topics in the intersection of science and society.

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Nuclear Weapons: Past and Present
Mar
30
9:00 AM09:00

Nuclear Weapons: Past and Present

How did nuclear weapons affect the course of the Cold War and what is their impact on world politics today? Is their abolition feasible or desirable? And what are the pros and cons of a nuclear free zone in the Arctic?

The Bill Graham Centre for Contemporary International History, in partnership with Project Ploughshares, presents a full-day conference to explore the effect of nuclear weapons on Canada and the world, yesterday and today. Historians, political scientists, and activists will explore this topic, which will conclude with a roundtable discussion with former Canadian foreign ministers.

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