junior fellows

  Jennifer Levin Bonder   Jennifer is a SSHRC funded doctoral student in the Department of History at the University of Toronto. Under the supervision of Robert Bothwell, she is researching the origins, functioning, and legacy of the Foreign Investment Review Agency (FIRA). A policy experiment during Pierre Trudeau’s time in office, FIRA was created to screen the foreign acquisition of Canadian firms and establishment of new business enterprises in Canada. She is interested in the nature of economic nationalism in Canada; the effects of foreign capital on Canadian society, politics, and development; and how Canada can learn from the policy experiments of the past.  Jennifer sits on the Graduate History Society as the representative to the Canadian Historical Association and is an associate editor with the Department’s peer reviewed journal,  Past Tense: Graduate Review of History . She is a Teaching Assistant for the third year course, “Canadian International Relations.” Jennifer is a Junior Fellow at both Massey College and The Bill Graham Centre for Contemporary International History.

Jennifer Levin Bonder

Jennifer is a SSHRC funded doctoral student in the Department of History at the University of Toronto. Under the supervision of Robert Bothwell, she is researching the origins, functioning, and legacy of the Foreign Investment Review Agency (FIRA). A policy experiment during Pierre Trudeau’s time in office, FIRA was created to screen the foreign acquisition of Canadian firms and establishment of new business enterprises in Canada. She is interested in the nature of economic nationalism in Canada; the effects of foreign capital on Canadian society, politics, and development; and how Canada can learn from the policy experiments of the past.

Jennifer sits on the Graduate History Society as the representative to the Canadian Historical Association and is an associate editor with the Department’s peer reviewed journal, Past Tense: Graduate Review of History. She is a Teaching Assistant for the third year course, “Canadian International Relations.” Jennifer is a Junior Fellow at both Massey College and The Bill Graham Centre for Contemporary International History.

  Susan Colbourn   Susan Colbourn is a Ph.D. Candidate in History at the University of Toronto. Her dissertation, entitled “Out of Area? The North Atlantic Treaty Organization and the Collapse of Détente, 1977-1982,” examines the alliance’s response to the unravelling of superpower détente. It considers, in particular, the intersection between nuclear, political, economic, cultural, and ideological questions in allied decision-making and allied perceptions of the Cold War. Prior to her doctoral studies, Susan completed an MA in the History of International Relations at the London School of Economics and Political Science (2011) and an Hon. BA in History and International Relations at the University of Toronto (Trinity College, 2009).

Susan Colbourn

Susan Colbourn is a Ph.D. Candidate in History at the University of Toronto. Her dissertation, entitled “Out of Area? The North Atlantic Treaty Organization and the Collapse of Détente, 1977-1982,” examines the alliance’s response to the unravelling of superpower détente. It considers, in particular, the intersection between nuclear, political, economic, cultural, and ideological questions in allied decision-making and allied perceptions of the Cold War. Prior to her doctoral studies, Susan completed an MA in the History of International Relations at the London School of Economics and Political Science (2011) and an Hon. BA in History and International Relations at the University of Toronto (Trinity College, 2009).

  Brendan Kelly   Brendan Kelly completed his PhD in History at the University of Toronto in 2016. His dissertation, “Marcel Cadieux, the Department of External Affairs, and Canadian International Relations: 1941-1970,” explores the career of arguably the most influential francophone diplomat and civil servant in Canadian history and the way his story illuminates larger issues relating to Canada at home and in the world. Brendan’s previous research on Aboriginal treaty-making and the Canadian home front during the Second World War has appeared in Prairie Forum, Great Plains Quarterly, and Urban History Review. He recently completed an article on the Pearson government and Gaullist France for Mike’s World: Lester Pearson and Canadian External Relations, 1963-1968, a collection of essays forthcoming from UBC Press, as well as an article on Marcel Cadieux and Pierre Trudeau to appear in International Journal. In addition to serving as Book Review Editor of International Journal, Brendan is working on articles on the Canadian presence in Vietnam in the 1950s and on Lester B. Pearson’s Temple University speech in 1965. He is also revising his thesis for publication.

Brendan Kelly

Brendan Kelly completed his PhD in History at the University of Toronto in 2016. His dissertation, “Marcel Cadieux, the Department of External Affairs, and Canadian International Relations: 1941-1970,” explores the career of arguably the most influential francophone diplomat and civil servant in Canadian history and the way his story illuminates larger issues relating to Canada at home and in the world. Brendan’s previous research on Aboriginal treaty-making and the Canadian home front during the Second World War has appeared in Prairie Forum, Great Plains Quarterly, and Urban History Review. He recently completed an article on the Pearson government and Gaullist France for Mike’s World: Lester Pearson and Canadian External Relations, 1963-1968, a collection of essays forthcoming from UBC Press, as well as an article on Marcel Cadieux and Pierre Trudeau to appear in International Journal. In addition to serving as Book Review Editor of International Journal, Brendan is working on articles on the Canadian presence in Vietnam in the 1950s and on Lester B. Pearson’s Temple University speech in 1965. He is also revising his thesis for publication.

  Meredith Kravitz   Meredith Kravitz is a Junior Fellow at The Bill Graham Centre for Contemporary International History. She is a doctoral candidate in international relations at the University of Toronto, focusing on resource competition, energy geopolitics, international security, and foreign policy. She also currently works as a researcher for the Arctic Security Program at the Walter and Duncan Gordon Foundation.  In 2010, Meredith graduated from Yale University’s Jackson Institute of Global Affairs with a Master of Arts in International Relations, where she obtained a Graduate Certificate of Specialization in International Security Studies. She also holds a Master of Arts in English: Issues in Modern Culture from University College London, and a Bachelor of Arts in Honours English Literature from Concordia University.

Meredith Kravitz

Meredith Kravitz is a Junior Fellow at The Bill Graham Centre for Contemporary International History. She is a doctoral candidate in international relations at the University of Toronto, focusing on resource competition, energy geopolitics, international security, and foreign policy. She also currently works as a researcher for the Arctic Security Program at the Walter and Duncan Gordon Foundation.

In 2010, Meredith graduated from Yale University’s Jackson Institute of Global Affairs with a Master of Arts in International Relations, where she obtained a Graduate Certificate of Specialization in International Security Studies. She also holds a Master of Arts in English: Issues in Modern Culture from University College London, and a Bachelor of Arts in Honours English Literature from Concordia University.

  Tina Park   Tina Park received her PhD from the History Department, University of Toronto, working on Korean-Canadian relations from the 1880s to the 1980s, under the supervision of Profs. Robert Bothwell, Margaret MacMillan, and Andre Schmid. She is also a co-founder and Executive Director of the Canadian Centre for the Responsibility to Protect (CCR2P), and co-founded, with Dr. Carolyn Bennett, the Women in House program.

Tina Park

Tina Park received her PhD from the History Department, University of Toronto, working on Korean-Canadian relations from the 1880s to the 1980s, under the supervision of Profs. Robert Bothwell, Margaret MacMillan, and Andre Schmid. She is also a co-founder and Executive Director of the Canadian Centre for the Responsibility to Protect (CCR2P), and co-founded, with Dr. Carolyn Bennett, the Women in House program.

  Sean Fear   Sean Fear is a U.S. Foreign Policy and International Security Postdoctoral Fellow at the Dartmouth College John Sloan Dickey Center for International Understanding. He completed his dissertation,  Republican Saigon’s Clash of Constituents: Domestic Politics and Civil Society in U.S.-South Vietnamese Relations, 1967-1971 , at Cornell University in August 2016. He was also an Agnese N. Haury Fellow at the New York University Center for the United States and Cold War. Sean’s research focuses on U.S.-South Vietnamese relations, and the impact of domestic politics and transnational relations on diplomacy. He has conducted research at several archives in the United States and Vietnam, drawing heavily on Vietnamese-language official records and print media.

Sean Fear

Sean Fear is a U.S. Foreign Policy and International Security Postdoctoral Fellow at the Dartmouth College John Sloan Dickey Center for International Understanding. He completed his dissertation, Republican Saigon’s Clash of Constituents: Domestic Politics and Civil Society in U.S.-South Vietnamese Relations, 1967-1971, at Cornell University in August 2016. He was also an Agnese N. Haury Fellow at the New York University Center for the United States and Cold War. Sean’s research focuses on U.S.-South Vietnamese relations, and the impact of domestic politics and transnational relations on diplomacy. He has conducted research at several archives in the United States and Vietnam, drawing heavily on Vietnamese-language official records and print media.

  Ari Barbalat   Ari Barbalat is a PhD Candidate in International Relations at UCLA. His thesis studies cross-regionalism in world politics, supervised by Professors Steven Spiegel and Richard Anderson. He holds a Master's in Middle Eastern Studies from University of Chicago (2008) and an Hon. B.A. in International Relations and History from University of Toronto, Trinity College (2006). Ari also specializes in Jewish thought and ethics pertaining to international relations, Israeli foreign policy in comparative perspective, international relations theory and the interplay of religion, literature and human rights. He is a native of Thornhill.

Ari Barbalat

Ari Barbalat is a PhD Candidate in International Relations at UCLA. His thesis studies cross-regionalism in world politics, supervised by Professors Steven Spiegel and Richard Anderson. He holds a Master's in Middle Eastern Studies from University of Chicago (2008) and an Hon. B.A. in International Relations and History from University of Toronto, Trinity College (2006). Ari also specializes in Jewish thought and ethics pertaining to international relations, Israeli foreign policy in comparative perspective, international relations theory and the interplay of religion, literature and human rights. He is a native of Thornhill.

  Simon Miles   Simon Miles is a Ph.D. candidate in the Department of History at the University of Texas at Austin and a Fellow at the William P. Clements Jr. Center for History, Strategy and Statecraft. During the 2014–2015 academic year, Simon is a Visiting Fellow at the Bill Graham Centre for Contemporary International History at the University of Toronto. Simon’s doctoral research project, funded by the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada, examines US-Soviet relations between 1980 and 1985 using archival sources from both sides of the Iron Curtain. It focuses on the frequent leadership changes in the Soviet Union, the management of international crises, and the role of nuclear weapons in the international system. He is a graduate of the University of Toronto and the London School of Economics and Political Science.

Simon Miles

Simon Miles is a Ph.D. candidate in the Department of History at the University of Texas at Austin and a Fellow at the William P. Clements Jr. Center for History, Strategy and Statecraft. During the 2014–2015 academic year, Simon is a Visiting Fellow at the Bill Graham Centre for Contemporary International History at the University of Toronto. Simon’s doctoral research project, funded by the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada, examines US-Soviet relations between 1980 and 1985 using archival sources from both sides of the Iron Curtain. It focuses on the frequent leadership changes in the Soviet Union, the management of international crises, and the role of nuclear weapons in the international system. He is a graduate of the University of Toronto and the London School of Economics and Political Science.

  Maria X. Chen – Visitor   Dr. Maria X. Chen is a historian of the twentieth century, with a particular focus on European culture and identity. Maria completed her PhD in International History at the London School of Economics and Political Science, where she is also a Postdoctoral Teaching Fellow. Her doctoral research focused on contemporary European integration and its effect on identities. She used the case study of the European Community’s wine policies and its impact on French wine producers to examine broader issues about the integration process, changes in local and regional identity, relationships between different levels of government, and food culture. Maria holds a B.A. from the University of Alberta and an M.Phil. from the University of Cambridge. Maria’s research interests are in Western European Integration History, post-1945 Europe, the cultural Cold War, issues of nationalism and identity, food and wine history, and jazz history.

Maria X. Chen – Visitor

Dr. Maria X. Chen is a historian of the twentieth century, with a particular focus on European culture and identity. Maria completed her PhD in International History at the London School of Economics and Political Science, where she is also a Postdoctoral Teaching Fellow. Her doctoral research focused on contemporary European integration and its effect on identities. She used the case study of the European Community’s wine policies and its impact on French wine producers to examine broader issues about the integration process, changes in local and regional identity, relationships between different levels of government, and food culture. Maria holds a B.A. from the University of Alberta and an M.Phil. from the University of Cambridge. Maria’s research interests are in Western European Integration History, post-1945 Europe, the cultural Cold War, issues of nationalism and identity, food and wine history, and jazz history.

  Ozren Jungic – Visitor   Ozren Jungic grew up in Vancouver, BC, and attended Simon Fraser University where he studied Business Administration and History. He completed his Master's at St Antony's College, Oxford, and his PhD at Magdalen College, Oxford. Oz has worked as an analyst and speechwriter at the prosecutor's office of the UN's International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia , as well as for the Office of the High Representative in Bosnia and Herzegovina. His research interests include modern conflict and international intervention, political transition, and ideology.

Ozren Jungic – Visitor

Ozren Jungic grew up in Vancouver, BC, and attended Simon Fraser University where he studied Business Administration and History. He completed his Master's at St Antony's College, Oxford, and his PhD at Magdalen College, Oxford. Oz has worked as an analyst and speechwriter at the prosecutor's office of the UN's International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia , as well as for the Office of the High Representative in Bosnia and Herzegovina. His research interests include modern conflict and international intervention, political transition, and ideology.

  Graeme Thompson – Visitor   Graeme Thompson is a DPhil Candidate in Global and Imperial History at St. Antony’s College, University of Oxford. His research centres on the political and intellectual history of the ‘British world’ and examines how ideas of Britishness, empire, and Anglo-Saxonism informed Canadian liberalism and nation-building in the early 20th century. More broadly, Graeme’s research interests include British imperial and commonwealth history, Anglophone political and economic thought, the history of international relations, and Canadian history. He holds a Master’s degree in the Theory and History of International Relations from the London School of Economics and a BA (hons) in Political Science from the University of Western Ontario.

Graeme Thompson – Visitor

Graeme Thompson is a DPhil Candidate in Global and Imperial History at St. Antony’s College, University of Oxford. His research centres on the political and intellectual history of the ‘British world’ and examines how ideas of Britishness, empire, and Anglo-Saxonism informed Canadian liberalism and nation-building in the early 20th century. More broadly, Graeme’s research interests include British imperial and commonwealth history, Anglophone political and economic thought, the history of international relations, and Canadian history. He holds a Master’s degree in the Theory and History of International Relations from the London School of Economics and a BA (hons) in Political Science from the University of Western Ontario.

  Matthew S. Wiseman – Visitor   Matthew S. Wiseman is a SSHRC Postdoctoral Fellow with the Bill Graham Centre and the Department of History at the University of Toronto. He earned his BA (Hons) and MA from Lakehead University before receiving his PhD from Wilfrid Laurier University and the Tri-University Graduate Program in History. His doctoral dissertation, currently under contract and forthcoming with a major academic press, examines the role of science and technology in the formation and development of Canada’s Arctic defence policy during the early Cold War. Matthew’s work has appeared in such leading publications as  Canadian Military History  and the  Journal of the Canadian Historical Association . His current postdoctoral research explores the militarization of university science in postwar Canada, with a particular focus on the social and environmental consequences of Arctic research.

Matthew S. Wiseman – Visitor

Matthew S. Wiseman is a SSHRC Postdoctoral Fellow with the Bill Graham Centre and the Department of History at the University of Toronto. He earned his BA (Hons) and MA from Lakehead University before receiving his PhD from Wilfrid Laurier University and the Tri-University Graduate Program in History. His doctoral dissertation, currently under contract and forthcoming with a major academic press, examines the role of science and technology in the formation and development of Canada’s Arctic defence policy during the early Cold War. Matthew’s work has appeared in such leading publications as Canadian Military History and the Journal of the Canadian Historical Association. His current postdoctoral research explores the militarization of university science in postwar Canada, with a particular focus on the social and environmental consequences of Arctic research.

  Michael Lumbers – Visitor   Michael Lumbers is a Visiting Fellow at The Bill Graham Centre for Contemporary International History. He obtained his PhD in International History from the London School of Economics and Political Science. His dissertation, which examined U.S. policy toward China during the administration of Lyndon Johnson, was published as Piercing the Bamboo Curtain: Tentative Bridge Building to China During the Johnson Years by Manchester University Press. A specialist in U.S. foreign policy and grand strategy, presidential decision making, Sino-American diplomatic history and contemporary strategic relations, and East-Asian security, his various articles have appeared in  The Washington Post, The National Interest, Diplomatic History, Journal of Cold War Studies, Jane’s Intelligence Review,  and other publications.

Michael Lumbers – Visitor

Michael Lumbers is a Visiting Fellow at The Bill Graham Centre for Contemporary International History. He obtained his PhD in International History from the London School of Economics and Political Science. His dissertation, which examined U.S. policy toward China during the administration of Lyndon Johnson, was published as Piercing the Bamboo Curtain: Tentative Bridge Building to China During the Johnson Years by Manchester University Press. A specialist in U.S. foreign policy and grand strategy, presidential decision making, Sino-American diplomatic history and contemporary strategic relations, and East-Asian security, his various articles have appeared in The Washington Post, The National Interest, Diplomatic History, Journal of Cold War Studies, Jane’s Intelligence Review, and other publications.

  Michael Urban – Visitor   Michael joined the Bill Graham Centre after having completed his doctorate in International Relations at Balliol College, University of Oxford. Michael’s dissertation, Imagined Security, examines the role of trust in international politics with a specific focus on how trust underpins the peace that has developed between advanced liberal democracies. In addition to trust and liberal democracy, Michael’s research interests include international relations theory, Canadian foreign policy, nuclear weapons and proliferation, and European integration.  Michael is the recipient of numerous academic awards including a 2007 Rhodes scholarship and a SSHRC doctoral fellowship. He was also the 2012-2013 Cadieux-Léger Fellow which saw him integrated into the Policy Research Division at the Department of Foreign Affairs, Trade, and Development in Ottawa. While at Oxford, Michael taught the core undergraduate “International Relations” course as well as the upper-year “International Relations in the Era of the Cold War” course. In addition to his doctorate, Michael holds an MPhil in International Relations from Oxford, an MA in International Affairs from the Norman Paterson School of International Affairs at Carleton University, and BAHs in History and Politics from Queen’s University.

Michael Urban – Visitor

Michael joined the Bill Graham Centre after having completed his doctorate in International Relations at Balliol College, University of Oxford. Michael’s dissertation, Imagined Security, examines the role of trust in international politics with a specific focus on how trust underpins the peace that has developed between advanced liberal democracies. In addition to trust and liberal democracy, Michael’s research interests include international relations theory, Canadian foreign policy, nuclear weapons and proliferation, and European integration.

Michael is the recipient of numerous academic awards including a 2007 Rhodes scholarship and a SSHRC doctoral fellowship. He was also the 2012-2013 Cadieux-Léger Fellow which saw him integrated into the Policy Research Division at the Department of Foreign Affairs, Trade, and Development in Ottawa. While at Oxford, Michael taught the core undergraduate “International Relations” course as well as the upper-year “International Relations in the Era of the Cold War” course. In addition to his doctorate, Michael holds an MPhil in International Relations from Oxford, an MA in International Affairs from the Norman Paterson School of International Affairs at Carleton University, and BAHs in History and Politics from Queen’s University.